What is 64-bit?

October 1, 2013

Have you noticed that the technical specifications for computing technology always seem to be numbers that double after a while? This has particularly been true of numbers with the word “bit” after them. 8-bit. 16-bit. 32-bit. And now, yes, 64-bit is the latest buzz. But if you’re a normal person (not a computer person), what does this mean?

One of my colleagues (Ed) sent me a link to this short article that loosely explains what 64-bit means to you, the normal person: What the iPhone 5s ’64-bit’ processor means, in plain English. I particularly like the library and book analogy. While I see from the comments that the true technophiles object to the explanation, I’m still going to call it good enough for the normal person. By passing it along, I hope it’s helpful to you or someone you know.


Prepare to disown your PC: a prediction on the future of personal computing

August 24, 2011

The introduction of the iPhone changed the destiny of your desktop PC. You probably just didn’t know it at the time.

Clearly, the iPhone was more than just another digital cell phone. It was primarily a computer that happened to include voice calling capabilities. It was a mini-PC in your pocket, like one of my close friends predicted over 15 years ago. But that’s not all. The “computer’s” operating system was different. The app store model for acquiring and installing “software” was drastically different as well. But in hindsight, though those were what got a lot of press at the time, there’s something else that the iPhone did to set the stage for the iPad and the next generation of personal computers: Read the rest of this entry »


How will you be served? A map of modern computing devices

August 17, 2011

My friend who got me into computing made a prediction almost 20 years ago. He was holding a calculator in his hand and said something to the effect of, “Our kids will walk around with something smaller than this that will be far more powerful than what’s on our desks today.” Now back then, powerful was a 486 or early Pentium class machine. But it wasn’t until the advent of the smartphone with the cell data network did his prediction come true. Smartphones are more computer than phone.

And yet, we still have desktop PCs. They’re tremendously more powerful and capable than smartphones (for now) — perhaps even more powerful than we should have imagined 20 years ago. So we find ourselves in a world with a variety of computing devices where no one “uber computing device” rules. I thought I’d perform a somewhat academic exercise and map these devices on a type of “infographic,” to help pinpoint where the gaps are as well as where each type of device excels. It’s a first draft, so feel free to comment. (Click below to get the full size version.)

A Comparison Map/Infographic of Modern Personal Computing Devices

A Comparison Map/Infographic of Modern Personal Computing Devices (Click to view full size image.)

(Note: I realize there certainly could be more spectra added to the map. For instance, I didn’t attempt to include Cost (both purchase price and on-going maintenance costs), User Skill Required for operation, options for Peripherals, etc. It’s not intended to be exhaustive.)

After completing the map, one thing stands out: there is no perfect device yet — no one personal computer option that is at the “best end” of all spectra nor one which falls solidly in the middle of all of them as a perfect balance. What do you think will fill the gap? How will you be served in the future?


ET’s Predictions (Year 2)

August 18, 2010

In keeping with Explain Technology’s anniversary tradition, it’s time to make some predictions about the technology market as it impacts new users of technology and how we who explain technology may need to acclimate. From my perspective, the future looks pretty sweet, and so this can be pretty short… Read the rest of this entry »


Rotary telephone vs. iPhone

June 28, 2010

Question: Is the iPhone (or iPad) intuitive?

Answer: Maybe.

In the past few months Read the rest of this entry »


The year in review: the state of (explaining) technology

August 17, 2009

As Explain Technology turns one year old, I thought it a great time to give a “State of Explaining Technology” address. What has changed in the technology space that affects the understanding of technology? How can those of us who seek to explain it learn how our models need to change? Where has there been improvement in technology design, allowing for easier adoption? Here’s a look back at several key areas… Read the rest of this entry »