Reflections on my relationship with Flash

February 14, 2014

Someone recently asked me why I liked Flash so much and have been a loyal advocate for so long. Even though HTML5 and modern browsers have allegedly (according to web design enthusiasts) rung the death knell for Flash, my affection for Flash lives on. But why? Well, I had to do some soul-searching to answer that, and my answer may surprise you with it’s simplicity that (perhaps rightly, perhaps blindly, depending on your perspective) ignores nearly all the technical pros/cons, tell-tale marketplace warnings, and standards-based arguments in the Flash vs. HTML5 debate. But hear me out….

I loved Flash because the products I created with it… just… worked. By “worked,” I mean my creations, designed once by me, were experienced by all end users how I meant for the experience to be “played back.”  Flash worked because the creation software and player/plugin were all offered and controlled by the same company. By having everything from creation to playback owned under one roof, you can expect it ought to have worked flawlessly. And nearly all of the time, it did. It’s not to say creating and deploying Flash-based projects was always easy or as clear to achieve as it could have been. But, from my designer’s point of view, once I validated that my creation worked, I could be confident it would work almost universally, for everyone. I could depend on it — rely on it to be close enough to “fact” that I didn’t have to worry about my creation being presented as anything other than intended to the end user. There’s something that feels “right” about that — something inside that says, “Yeah, it shouldn’t have to be any harder than this.”

Contrast that to the web browsers of Macromedia Flash’s hayday, all from different vendors, all with different features, all with incompatibilities, standardization largely lacking. As I’m fond of saying, no one won the browser war, but the consumers definitely lost. (And in some ways, perhaps us designers did, too.) Faced with those browsers — a “playback” mechanism that I could never be guaranteed would present a creation consistently or faithfully — it’s still not hard for me to look back and validate my affection for Flash. Imagine being a major motion picture studio, releasing a film to theaters around the world, and never knowing if each moviegoer in each theater will have the same experience. Imagine an experience where, in some theaters’ presentation of your film, an actor mysteriously (or perhaps magically) simply doesn’t show up in a scene or two of the completed film. That’s what trying to create rich web experiences felt like during the browser wars without Flash. And while HTML5 standards seem to be heading the right direction now, it still feels that way to a certain extent. It feels like creating a single experience shouldn’t be as hard as it still is.

I understand all the pros/cons of standards, innovation, monopolies, software life-cycles, etc. My mind knows all that. But I can’t help feeling that those of us who love designing digital experiences for others to consume continue to spend more time on technical nuances of the presentation/playback product (out of unfortunate necessity) than on the part of the craft we enjoy. It’s that part of me that loves Flash. In a relatively easy-to-understand interface, it allowed creators to produce relatively rich experiences for the masses to consume, without the mess of sifting the browser vendors’ junk. So Flash or no Flash, I hope those days I remember so fondly will return in the future — for the good of all of us who love creation of the experience more than the gritty technical details.


UPDATE: Three days after posting this, Lars Doucet shared some similar feelings on Flash development in his post: Flash is dead; long live OpenFL!

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