Explain/Teach Nearly Anything with this Hands-on Game

November 20, 2013

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cloudBoard is a new project on Kickstarter that intrigues me as it uses a physical board with puzzle-like pieces and a digital computer game component to teach various concepts, primarily to kids. I think this learning approach is ingenious, as it blends kids’ natural desire to play with (and relate to) something physical (like a classic board/puzzle game) and yet leverages the ability to drive video games, providing a rich visual element kids love. And not just kids. The guys at Digital Dream Labs have play-tested their invention with kids and adults alike, often finding that it bridges the generation gap, engaging young and old alike. Early play-testing also revealed some encouraging results with autistic individuals.

How’s it work? Players place various tiles in the cloudBoard in specific positions or sequences, and that becomes a direct link to functionality and features enabled in the video game. Repetitive play — the key to learning — is easy, accomplished by simply swapping or rearranging the pieces in the board, allowing learners to tinker with various configurations.

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3 things I love most about the cloudBoard project:

It bridges the physical and virtual. I’ve long been a believer in leveraging aspects of the physical world in explanation and teaching because people connect with physical things in a unique and memorable way. cloudBoard takes this to a whole new level, grabbing the best aspects of board and puzzle-piece games from our childhood while marrying them to what’s possible with modern digital computer technologies. And unlike the Skylanders concept, where the physical figure’s position or relationship to other figures is irrelevant, the physical cloudBoard pieces mean different things when they’re in different positions on the board.

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It’s not just a single game. Multiple games can be supported. While the Cork The Volcano game — designed to teach trial-and-error concepts, key to understanding computer programming — is the first game to be released, the Digital Dream Labs dudes have multiple other concepts in the works, including a chemisty game, a music game, and a farming game. Virtually any game can be created with the right software and new tops to the puzzle pieces. And here’s where the real extensibility of the cloudBoard concept shines…

Developers can extend it themselves.  I spoke with Justin Sabo from Digital Dream Labs, and I think this is a point worth emphasizing about their project. The game APIs will be open to those who wish program their own video game to interface with the cloudBoard hardware. And unlike some other game systems, cloudBoard is designed to run the same across many platforms (tablet, PC, etc.), extending its usefulness.

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The tops of the puzzle pieces can also be swapped with other tops, allowing the physical aspect to be ever-changable but using the original pieces. (You don’t necessarily need brand new pieces for every game; just change the toppers.) Change the pictures? Fine. Add fuzzy three-dimensional toppers? Go for it. 3D-print your own? Why not? This is part of the future vision that Justin shared with me — that what they’ve created is a platform others can easily expand upon. Who knows how many educational games could be created.

Here’s what I don’t like about the cloudBoard project:

It’s not fully funded yet.  So spread the word and head on over to the cloudBoard kickstarter page to help make it a reality.