UPCP 1-Year Anniversary Thoughts (and 15% discount)

Today, I’m celebrating the 1-Year anniversary of the publication of The Ultimate PC Primer.  And for the entire month of May, the 15% discount is back. That’s right. This isn’t a one-day special just for Star Wars Day; I’m keeping the party going all month. Use code 3SGC9EP7 to get 15% off all copies when you order here.

In case you haven’t noticed from this blog, I’m pretty passionate about the book’s contents, approach, and mission. Here are some brief thoughts on why a guy with a family and full-time job spends 6 years of his own (precious little spare) time and money producing, of all things, a printed book explaining basic computer concepts…

Nothing else uses the same approach — analogies, metaphors, stories, and illustrations from real, physical things — to explain essential computing concepts. I searched for and even purchased a good number of “intro” computer books, only find they were mostly procedural “how-to” guides. Only one even came close to helping readers actually understand what they were supposed to be learning to use. In short, most computer books assumed readers just needed to know steps to “do” a task. I wanted to help build a foundation from which new users could begin to be self sufficient.

I wanted to help users who truly knew nothing; help them lose the fear, and begin to relate to common computer technology. Many newcomers have at least some pre-existing knowledge or computer exposure, and there are some pretty good books out there for them. But there’s not much in print from major computer book publishers for those who are at absolute ground zero, having never touched a PC before. Some naysayers have suggested to me such a book is already obsolete. Since my day job is handling technology-based training for a Fortune 100 company, I certainly know where those skeptics are coming from. Yes, the PC landscape is changing. But even with tablets, touch and persistent connectivity, many core concepts of computing are very much the same, no matter the device. It’s the mental framework for engaging a personal computing device that most newcomers really need. So while some of the content will undoubtedly eventually become obsolete, the approach certainly won’t. If anything, I’m finding more opportunity than ever to explain computers and other digital technology using that approach.

The book’s target audience is those approaching or in retirement; essentially senior citizens. This is where the greatest gap in adoption still exists. I caught wind of this new Pew research data on Internet usage, and as you can see, there is still a huge gap between those under 65 and those above. (It’s less than 50%  adoption for those 65 and older, though total adoption is 80%. 12% don’t even own a computer!) This is particularly interesting and timely considering I also just read a news article about how US Series E Savings Bonds can now only be purchased online. It’s the latest in a number of government services that can only be acquired via the Internet. You’d think in light of this, plus limited mobility of those older, would actually equate to higher usage than 50%. A lot of the people in the 60 and older demographic clearly think computing and the internet are too difficult to engage later in life. I didn’t want them to be left behind. I wanted to provide the encouragement, break down the fear barrier, and do that through everyday things each reader could relate to. And while I’m a big supporter of local community classes offered by colleges, libraries, and SeniorNet, some newcomers don’t have the gumption to sign-up for such services. It requires admitting in front of others they’re in that segment which knows nothing, feeling like an outsider. That’s precisely why I wrote and published a book (in print) rather than making an e-book, DVD, online video, lecture series or curriculum. I wanted to offer each reader the chance to explore the concepts of computing in the most familiar, safe way possible, at an affordable price.

My book will never sell a million copies. I don’t care. I didn’t do it to become famous or rich. Computer literacy training isn’t my day job (though I can say what I learned by doing it has also helped me professionally in a number of ways.) I did it because I know my approach works, no one else was doing it, and I had what it took to put it all together. It’s my hope it changes a lot of newcomers’ worlds for the better.  And for the rest — the explainers, designers, and developers — I hope the approach and concept — the way of thinking about and presenting intangible, virtual concepts through narratives, analogies, metaphors, and direct comparisons to real-world physical things — helps you think of your users and audiences in new ways as well.

Happy anniversary!

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