Technology Mindedness Test

March 18, 2010

Immersed in technology consulting over the last year, I have encountered a number of situations in which my clients have demonstrated an awareness that increased technology knowledge (on their part) might be beneficial. In short, they realize they don’t think like “technology-minded people,” and they want to know how. While their intentions are good, their questions are misguided. Questions like, “What should I read,” “what should I study…” and even “who should I hire?”

These questions reveal a deeper issue: someone not technology-minded often won’t know what technology mindedness looks like. “Technology acuity” is perceived as something that can be acquired through “old school” means if one simply had a list of the “correct” means. While I certainly don’t discount the value of multiple methods of learning, trying to “learn technology” like a historical subject — without understanding the nature of technology itself — is folly. “Technology” is  (sorry to use a negative concept) like the cold virus. There isn’t just one. It can’t be memorized. The best in the field seek not to carve its traits in stone, but to understand its nature. The world we live in expects technology-knowledge to be increasing every day, so trying to “fake it” is self-defeating in the long-run. There’s a disparity in the two models of learning and understanding that can’t be reconciled.

I tried to think of a way to illustrate this for my clients, and I came up with a simple comparison test: two questions, asked of a set of technology-savvy individuals I know and then asked also of my clients. When compared, the differences in answers should stand out. Here’s the test: Read the rest of this entry »

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